Ministry launches Jordan’s National Water Conservation Plan 2024

Water
Photo credit: Kazinform

Minister of Water and Irrigation, Raed Abu Saud, highlighted the significant water challenges Jordan faces, including resource scarcity, climate change, and a decline in the per capita share to less than 61 cubic meters annually for all uses, Petra reports.

During the launch ceremony of the National Water Conservation Plan 2024 on Tuesday, Abu Saud emphasized the water sector's ongoing efforts to align with the Economic Modernization Vision. These efforts include exploring non-traditional sources, notably the desalination of Red Sea water through the National Carrier Project, reducing water losses, addressing illegal water usage, increasing water and sanitation services, utilizing treated water, and enhancing the role of youth in the water sector.

The plan aims to promote long-term water conservation and efficient use across various sectors, defining institutional and national roles for the sustainability and conservation of water sources as outlined in the National Water Strategy, Water Policies, and Economic Modernization Vision. It also seeks to strengthen partnerships with the private sector and support scientific research and legislative development related to water consumption.

Abu Saud stated that the plan is a crucial step toward securing Jordan's water future by prioritizing demand management and sustainable use for future generations.

On the sidelines of the launch, the Ministry of Water unveiled the creative identity "Water for Lasting Good."

Assistant Secretary-General of the Water Authority of Jordan, Omar Salama, emphasized the importance of this identity, which invites every Jordanian to participate in preserving water. The identity aims to increase awareness of responsible water use and ensure that water conservation principles are passed on to future generations.

Salama called on all sectors to participate in creating a national movement for efficient water use to achieve sustainable water security. He stressed the importance of the private sector in promoting this identity, particularly in high-consumption sectors like agriculture, tourism, and industry.

USAID Mission Director Leslie Reed stated that the creative identity "Water for Lasting Good" would facilitate the adoption of water-efficient technologies and behavioral changes at both institutional and individual levels. She noted that the plan focuses on managing water demand and preserving it alongside managing supplies and investments in high-cost infrastructure, thus enhancing national water security.

The plan includes 16 initiatives covering all water use sectors, focusing on legislative aspects to increase efficiency, institutional coordination, private sector participation, awareness programs, and changing societal behavior towards more efficient water use.

The USAID supported the ministry in formulating this plan through the Water Conservation Project, in collaboration with over 200 participants from major sectors of the Jordanian economy, aiming to improve water use efficiency in the agricultural, industrial, and municipal sectors.

The ceremony featured an explanatory video outlining the plan's strategic objectives, addressing several water sector management issues. It also included a dialogue session discussing various topics such as water demand management, water conservation in agriculture, the role of water companies, and innovation in water use efficiency.

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