You, I and AI: How artificial intelligence is transforming dating, marriage and human relationships

AI event at Astana Hub
Dr. Michael Hsieh, a nonresident affiliate at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford Photo credit: Arman Aisultan/Kazinform

On May 14, 2024, the Astana Hub hosted a discussion on the topic “You, I and AI: How artificial intelligence is transforming dating, marriage and human relationships,” Kazinform News Agency correspondent reports.

The lecturer was Dr. Michael Hsieh, a nonresident affiliate at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford, with over twenty years of experience in the US technology industry. He specializes in projects with high risk and great prospects in the field of AI, quantum information and digital security.

Dr. Hsieh talked about the benefits of artificial intelligence, emphasizing its ability to help people. He gave an example of using AI to write text as intended by a person, which can be useful for people with disabilities.

The lecturer then discussed the AI love phenomenon, highlighting that some people may have feelings for AI. He noted that such feelings may be due to the ability of AI to read thoughts and better understand its partner, however, AI also has disadvantages. As an illustration, the story was given of Eren, who was in love with an AI, however she was later disappointed in its responses. So, at one point the AI told her that he did not love her. He also called her by another name.

The third part of his speech was devoted to the role of AI in finding a partner. Hsieh argued that there are specialized companies that use AI to analyze personality characteristics and provide recommendations for selecting a partner based on individual preferences.

Dr. Hsieh presented statistics on divorce among couples who met through various means after 10 years of marriage. When people meet at work, divorce occurs in 24% of cases, while for those who met online, this figure drops to 20%. At the bar and meeting people through mutual friends, divorce occurs in 19% and 15% of cases, respectively. Statistics also show that couples who met at school or university get divorced less often - in only 13% of cases.

Then he drew attention to the divorce rate among couples who met through AI. According to his data, couples who met through AI are much less likely to get divorced (2%) than couples who met through other means. This is presumably because AI algorithms help match partners more accurately based on their characteristics and preferences, which in turn leads to better, longer-lasting relationships.

However, he also noted that there is also a bias in that only people who used AI to find a partner are considered, and that this to some extent characterizes people who use modern technologies.

In conclusion, Dr. Hsieh emphasized that artificial intelligence can play a positive role in forming relationships, helping people find the right partner and maintaining their relationships, and can also be a partner itself.

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